Decrypting app.Config

Decrypting app.Config

Do you need to decrypt an app.config file? There are lots of directions explaining the process if you’re dealing with a web application, but if you’re dealing with a windows app or a service of some sort, you don’t have a web.config…  all you have is an app.config. The process isn’t all that different.

Here’s what an encrypted app.config “appSettings” section might look like.

CustomPrincipal and Serialization

CustomPrincipal and Serialization

Recently, I’ve been working on a project that relies on a backend business object layer.  The business object (BO) layer, requires authentication in order to be used.  For most of the systems, this is okay, but my project is to be used by end users.  We don’t need to authenticate the users… we need to authenticate the system.

This is easy enough using the CustomPrincipal object in Rocky Lhotka’s CSLA framework (which is also being used).  We simply create the CustomPrincipal and add that to the ApplicationContext.

Release Mode error message

We’re approaching delivery of the baby!  In the next few months, we’ll be releasing our product.  This is great news as it’s been a long time coming.  As is the norm, we’ve been developing our product in Debug mode.  While in Debug mode, Visual Studio will generate extra files to allow stepping through the code.  This is a great thing for creating the initial code, but it’s not necessary for code that’s deployed to the world at large.

When I switched Visual Studio over from Debug mode to Release mode, I got a weird error.

Displaying Assembly Version Information

On a lot of my websites, I find it very useful to know exactly what version I’m working with.  Not only the version number, but also whether or not it’s running in RELEASE or DEBUG mode.

To accomplish this, it’s a fairly simple process.  Just put a Label control on your webform and then set the text property of it.  Here’s some sample code.

System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException

Recently, we’ve had some fairly serious problems on our network. This has led to the admin staff removing our network profiles. It was an accident, but it still happend. The problem is now that the entire IT staff has to reconfigure our workstations.

We’re using Visual Studio 2008 for our web applications. I finally got my code base updated via Subversion (no small feat) and tried to open a solution. I was presented with an error message stating:

System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException

It appears this is caused by IIS not being installed or properly configured.  Since my network profile had to be rebuilt my rights need to be reset also.  They didn’t make me an administrator of my box so I can’t check it.